One Song For You

the notes I wrote on hollow walls

Posts tagged mindless ones

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Mindless Defectors on True Detective

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Still fired up from February’s discussion of what’s worth watching on American TV, Mindless twinset Mark (Amypoodle) and Adam (Adam) have written an Experts Guide to HBO’s ‘True Detective’ and weird comic book fiction for Comic Alliance.

There’s a lot of great stuff about Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, H.P. Lovecraft and Thomas Ligotti in that post – if you’ve read any of Mark or Adam‘s stuff before, you’ll know what to expect, and if not you’re going to enjoy finding out!

Filed under Grant Morrison True Detective Alan Moore Thomas Ligotti Mindless Ones Mindless Self-Promotion H.P. Lovecraft

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Strangely, given their origins as rhythms for rappers to ride, Clammy Clams’ production has perhaps more in common with the soundscapes of Burial or Actress than it does with Hype Williams’ snap and echo. Clams Casino beats tend to rise and fall as part of the instrumentation around them, with the snap of the drums sounding like the thud of a human heartbeat, an intimate part of the ragged exhalation that accompanies it…
Patterns of a Diamond Ceiling #3: Live From the Haunted Broom Cupboard

Filed under Clams Casino Hype Williams Mindless Ones Mindless Self-Promotion Patterns of a Diamond Ceiling

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"A little less Stalingrad, a lot more Warhammer 40K"

Kieron Gillen let the mask slip a little at the start, when he positioned this comic as the anti-ASS, as a refutation of Superman’s central place in 20th Century history, in a spiel designed to mark Über out as being a comic free of the sort of self-commentary that defines so many modern superhero comics.  “It’s probably the least ironic book I’ve ever written,” he said:

It has nothing to say about superhero comics. In fact, its utter negation of that genre-criticism may be the closest it comes to commentary. I’ve read many books which seem to labour under the delusion that the conception of Superman was the most important moment in the 1930s. This isn’t one of them.  My only interest is in how I can use this genre’s conceit to create metaphors to explores aspects of WW2…

This comment, buried as it was in the mix of metatextual soul searching and historical gamesmanship of Über‘s backmatter, provides the key to understanding the uncanny dynamics of this comic.  In attempting to ward off irony and meta-commentary, Gillen negated any possibility of this comic escaping the superhero meta-conversation. Which, it turns out, is actually quite fitting in the end.  Carefully researched as Über might be, with everything from troop movements to weather conditions having been taken into account, this WW2 with superheroes fantasy is still a superhero fantasy, and as such it manages the odd trick of destroying both history and genre conventions and reinforcing them at the same time.

Mindless Ones: A History of Violence – Über, Zero, Pretty Deadly and Three Reviewed

Filed under Kieron Gillem Caanan White Über Mindless Ones gud comics comic book reviews

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This arrived in the comic shop with much less fanfare than your average doodlebug, but as soon as Gary sent up the siren I goosestepped down the hill to fetch it quicksmart. Got it home and more or less enjoyed it – it was straightforward, no-nonsense/lots of nonsense, pretty much alright.

Except for the Xmen stuff, the so-and-so superhero is married to so-and-so superhero’s cousin’s brother-in-law stuff, I could do without all that. These Victorian superheroes with big cars – like, their big car is the superpower – they’d died out quite naturally by the middle of the last century, which was OK. Bringing them back, trying to give them a dignity and relevance beyond their sell by - just can’t really see why this is any less wank than any other variety of steampunk: Dave McKean and Jeremy Clarkson polishing the cogs on their beaver hats, compulsively checking their gold atomic pocket watches.

Bobsy Mindless reviews LOEG: Nemo: The Roses of Berlin so you don’t have to!

Seriously though, not writing about this comic will save your “shift” and “;” keys from taking a hideous battering. 

Filed under The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Nemo: The Roses of Berlin Alan Moore kevin o'neill comics Mindless Ones bobsy your best interests (I have them in my heart)

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Ulli Lust – Today Is The Last Day of the Rest of Your Life

People complained that Eddie Campbell’s review of Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life didn’t discuss the art in enough detail, but in praising the sustained consistency of Lust’s line, Campbell identified the book’s strongest aspect: its cumulative effect.

In Lust’s hands, scenes of cruel realism like this one…

…and bursts of pained expressionism like this…

…feel of a piece as equally true depictions of her experience, separated by a couple of hundred pages of hurt and by a trail of footsteps that lead from one country to another and back again.

The unified nature of Lust’s approach underlines the lacerating consistency of her encounters with men; to notice one is to be barbed by the other.

That this sense of sustained, wearying horror doesn’t quite manage to define the long adventure chronicled in Today Is The Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a testament to the desire for freedom and knowledge that lead her on this journey in the first place, and which is articulated in every line on every page of this long, difficult autobiographical comic.

(From Mindless Ones - Fresh off the Loo, Here’s Some Comics Reviews)

Filed under Ulli Lust Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life autobiographix gud comics comics art Mindless Ones

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Marc-Antoine Mathieu – 3″
A murder mystery that takes place in three seconds and 900,000 kilometres, 3″ exists in that strange borderland where something that would seem like a novelty item if it was less professionally produced attains a certain experimental aura by virtue of its execution.
Marc-Antoine Mathieu manipulates the reader’s experience of this interzone with astonishing ease, putting them in the position of a particle of light as it zips through a crime scene in a series of relentless zooms. This is the sort of comic that teaches you how to read it as you go; if 3″ is to be read at all it must be read in a state of heightened attention.
Then again, the same could be said of Where’s Wally?

(From Mindless Ones - Fresh off the Loo, Here’s Some Comics Reviews)

Marc-Antoine Mathieu – 3″

A murder mystery that takes place in three seconds and 900,000 kilometres, 3″ exists in that strange borderland where something that would seem like a novelty item if it was less professionally produced attains a certain experimental aura by virtue of its execution.

Marc-Antoine Mathieu manipulates the reader’s experience of this interzone with astonishing ease, putting them in the position of a particle of light as it zips through a crime scene in a series of relentless zooms. This is the sort of comic that teaches you how to read it as you go; if 3″ is to be read at all it must be read in a state of heightened attention.

Then again, the same could be said of Where’s Wally?

(From Mindless Ones - Fresh off the Loo, Here’s Some Comics Reviews)

Filed under Marc-Antoine Mathieu 3 Comics Mindless Ones Comic art

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Ab-Soul’s too stoned and too subtle to make an album full of straight bangers, but there’s something about the raw fluidity of his rhymes that just gets to me. The way he can get stuck on a series of punishing homonyms for most of a verse before switching his flow up to effortlessly hit series of breathlessly off-kilter punchlines suggests the movement of a mind that’s still in the process of making itself up. This sits in stark-contrast to Lamar’s ever-more impressive verbal gymnastics: the power of good kid, m.A.A.d. city lies in the fact that it always seems like Kendrick knows what he’s doing, while the genius of Control System is that it makes you feel like you’re thinking these thoughts for the first time every time.


The cracks in Ab-Soul’s voice have as much to do with this as words he’s speaking. See, for example, the slight break that occurs as his voice raises at the end of the line “Hennessey and Coke, 1800/We mixing dark and light like it’s the 1800s” in ‘Bohemian Grove’. This slight inflection makes the sideways synaptic shift from drinking to the history of slavery sound like an accident, like a connection that Ab-Soul was unaware of until he’d made it.

Patterns of a Diamond Ceiling #2: Ab-Soul, Abstract, A$$hole

Filed under Ab-Soul TDE Black Hippy Kendrick Lamar Mindless Ones Patterns of a Diamond Ceiling

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Fresh of the Loo, Here’s Some Comics Reviews!

I wrote about comics by Harvey Pekar, Joseph Remnant, Moogs Kewell, Marc-Antoine Mathieu and Ulli Lust for the Mindless Ones tonight.

Harvey Pekar’s Cleveland and Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life are two of the best comics I’ve read in the last year, and I can only hope that I’ve done them justice here. 

Filed under Harvey Pekar Joseph Remnant Ulli Lust Marc-Antoine Mathieu Moogs Kewell Cleveland Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life 3 Big in Japan Comics Mindless Ones autobiographix etc