One Song For You

the notes I wrote on hollow walls

3 notes

A Toothache Away From Monstrosity

The minor inconveniences of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow are making a daily mockery of my self-image as a patient man with a decent sense of perspective.

Argue with me and I’ll almost certainly get on your tits by trying to see things from twenty points of view at once, even as I try to work up twenty more reasons why each of those positions are shite.

Drop me in an anti-social interview and I’ll keep my Captain Reasonable hat on even while chairs fly and swearwords heat up the room until it’s fit to curdle your balls.

Ask me to use a different exit at the train station from the one I normally use and I’ll spend the next ten minutes complaining about a sixty second inconvenience.

The point being that however much I might want to pretend that I’m not a huffy wee arsehole, I definitely am!

As the lovely Holly M. said when I voiced these worries elsewhere, "We’re all a toothache, a microaggression, an inconvenience away from monstrosity."

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[THE PHOTO AT THE TOP OF THIS POST SHOWS A SCOTRAIL CARRIAGE WHERE ALL THE LIGHTS HAVE WENT OFF - I’VE EXPERIENCED THIS A COUPLE OF TIMES SINCE THE GAMES STARTED AND THEY ADDED MORE CARRIAGES TO SOME JOURNIES, BUT THE PHOTO OF THIS PARTICULAR INCIDENT WAS TAKEN BY LINDSAY MCMILLAN.]

Filed under minor inconveniences major huffiness The Commonwealth Games

21 notes

I was aware that it was a period film when we were shooting, only we were making it in the present. I knew there would be things that distinguished the years from one another, though actually I thought there would be more examples in the culture. What happened is that it was really only apparent in the technology. I thought there’d be parts where you went, “Oh, that’s so mid 2000s!” But it’s all in the games, cellphones, computers. There’s no car that drives by and makes you think “That’s so 2004!” There are no hairstyles or clothes that really leap out at you. If you were to start in 1970 and go to 1982, you’d begin with hippy rock, then punk would it emerge, then it would get New Wave-y. Cars would have changed significantly. That didn’t really happen here.
Richard Linklater, discussing his excellent, adaptive movie Boyhood with Sight & Sound

Filed under richard linklater Boyhood Technology and change Sight & Sound movies

10 notes

In 1930, John Maynard Keynes wrote an essay called ‘Economic possibilities for our Grandchildren’. He predicted that within a century we would be living in “a new era of leisure”, we would all be working only 15 hours a week but four to eight times richer. Technological advancement would mean that our material needs would be met through an ever-declining amount of human labour.


The dreams of ‘a new era of leisure’ seem oddly utopian now. Rather than technological development being used to ease the workload of everyone, it has created a ‘rat race’; the endless pursuit of more profit, leading to endless consumption. ‘Work to earn to consume’ is the mantra of modern life. Our “time, like work, has become commodified – a recent legacy of industrial capitalism” (NEF, 2011: 2). Even if this era of consumption was the optimum solution, it would still be environmentally unsustainable. The fact that it is both an unhappy arrangement whilst simultaneously damaging the planet, only emphasises the need for change.


Of all the solutions to create a sustainable planet with a stronger economy, greater equality and a happier population, the redistribution of working-time is one of the most under-appreciated. In the era of industrial capitalism, shortening the working week was a common slogan of the labour movement. It is therefore surprising that in the internet age, where place and time have been compressed, the issue of working time rarely seems to hit the headlines. Doubly so since the imbalance between overwork and un(der)employment is greater than ever.


In Scotland, we are currently engaged in a debate about our nation’s future and how best to allocate our resources, both human and natural. It is only right, therefore, that the issue of time is put back on the agenda, and that an assessment of whether it can be useful in solving numerous problems – societal, environmental, economic, psychological – is made.

The Jimmy Reid Foundation - Time For Life

Filed under Common Weal The Jimmy Reid Foundation scottish independence Indy Ref Time For Life